The Pros And Cons Of A Pre-Charged Pressure Tank

If your home gets its water from a well, a well pump pulls the water out of the well and deposits it into the pressure tank. When you turn on water in your home, the pressure tank pushes the water into your pipes, delivering it into the shower, sink, or water appliance you turned on. If you are in need of a new pressure tank, you may find yourself debating between a traditional air-over-water tank or considering a newer pre-charged pressure tank. Learning the pros and cons will help you decide which is the better option for your home. Here are a couple of the pros and cons of a pre-charged pressure tank.

Cons of a Pre-Charged Pressure Tank

  • You Have to Check the Air Pressure

One of the downsides to a pre-charged pressure tank is that you have to check the pressure often. If the pressure is low, water can have a hard time entering your pipes. The pressure must be checked at least twice a year, but it is highly recommended that you check it more frequently, with the recommendation being every other month. If the pressure is low, you must add more air to the pre-charged tank. All in all, this means this type of tank requires a bit more maintenance than a standard air-over-water tank, which is important to keep in mind if maintenance is an issue for you.

  • Cost

The other downside to a pre-charged pressure tank is that the pressure tank is a bit more than an air-over-water tank. There are many factors that affect the cost of a tank, including the brand of tank you buy, size of tank, and whether it is made from steel or fiberglass. But as a general rule of thumb, pre-charged tanks tend to run more than comparable air-over-water tanks.

Pros of a Pre-Charged Pressure Tank

  • Smaller in Size

The biggest upside to a pre-charged pressure tank is that they are smaller in size than an air-over-water tank. This is because the pressurized air helps to force the water out of the tank, so less air is required to make this push. With an air-over-water tank, more air is required to push the water out of the tank, and as such, the tank is larger in size. Think of it like a bottle of soda. If you have a half filled two liter and lightly shake it, you can force some of the soda out of the bottle. However, if you have a one liter bottle and heavily shake it, you can force more soda out of the bottle, even though it contains the same amount of soda as the other bottle. This is because there was more pressure in the smaller bottle. If you have limited space, a pre-charged pressure tank is perfect for you.

  • You Can Replace the Bladder

The other advantage to pre-charged pressure tanks is that you can replace the bladder when it fails. This is the part of the tank that holds the water. In an air-over-water tank, a diaphragm holds the water. If this fails, it cannot be replaced. All in all, this allows a pre-charged tank to last for a longer period of time, as long as the bladder is replaced as needed.

If you are looking to replace your existing well pressure tank or are installing a new well system, you have to decide between an air-over-water tank or a pre-charged pressure tank. Learning the pros and cons will help you make the decision that is right for you.


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